The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

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Hellllllo readers, what do we think of the new fancy opening to the blog post? I’ve decided that instead of using my stereotypical ‘A review from My Little Book Blog,’ I’m going to make an image for every single review – cause ya know why not. Also interestingly I’ve actually got a couple of book box subscription reviews coming up so look forward to them – for now, LE REVIEW.

Don Tillman, professor of genetics, has never been on a second date. He is a man who can count all his friends on the fingers of one hand, whose lifelong difficulty with social rituals has convinced him that he is simply not wired for romance. So when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a “wonderful” husband, his first reaction is shock.

Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and he embarks upon The Wife Project. She will be punctual and logical—most definitely not a barmaid, a smoker, a drinker, or a late-arriver.

Yet Rosie Jarman is all these things. She is also beguiling, fiery, intelligent—and on a quest of her own. She is looking for her biological father, a search that a certain DNA expert might be able to help her with. Don’s Wife Project takes a back burner to the Father Project and an unlikely relationship blooms, forcing the scientifically minded geneticist to confront the spontaneous whirlwind that is Rosie—and the realization that love is not always what looks good on paper.

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Let’s try and ignore allll of the reviews that say this is a novel about Sheldon Cooper trying to Find a Wife – it kind of is, but it also isn’t.  Don Till man is a genetics professor in his late thirties who wants to find a spouse by creating a very in-depth questionnaire. See, Don leads a very fussy life and throughout the story there are allusions that Don has Aspergers. However, Rosie becomes part of his life and she completely goes across everything in Don’s list of attributes; but a beautiful friendship (kind of) blossoms.

Don and Rosie are fantastic characters – Don’s constant flow of thought processes, and a need to keep his life constant is a continually contrasted with Rosie’s slightly outlandish and unbalanced way of life. Don’s need for example to eat the same thing each night (to minimise waste and time) the time he gets refused from a club despite it being a very expensive, waterproof model and generally messing things up in social situations is delightfully wonderful to read and equally interesting.

The storyline revolves around Don’s wife project (which 250000% does not include Rosie,) and Rosie’s father project which revolves around her need to find her biological father and deal with the stress of her relationship with her adopted father. Throughout both learn a lot about the other and how the other interacts and lives. A particularly special moment is when they travel together to New York; their two personalities together in a new place creates a beautiful section of storytelling.

In terms of genre this is really a romantic comedy and I think if you are fan of either the romantic or comedy style genre you will enjoy this. The writing throughout the book is really clever, the pace moves quickly and will pace but still manages to squeeze in numerous story-lines and supporting characters. The author has created really brilliant contrasts between each of the character’s ways of speaking which really adds to the dialogue of the book. I also loved how the author included a number of social gaffes, but Don is incredibly resilient and almost practical in them. He understands his strengths, his memory, his ability to being smart and dedicated; for example…

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Overall this was a really lovely tale, that I thoroughly enjoyed. I can’t comment to throughly on the use of Aspergus because I just don’t have enough knowledge and I know there has been a little upset about how it’s portrayed. Overall I thought this was a fantastic book full of love romance and comedy and I can’t wait to read the second.

LINNNNNNKKKKS

Amazon

Goodreads

Author Website 

Unexpected: Short Stories from Around the World by P.F. Citizen One

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Hello readers, hope you’re well and having a fantastic Wednesday. I’ve got a hella load of news to share with you this week and I’m excited to get to it, but today I’ve also got a really brilliant interview with a new author friend of mine. I know there have been a lot of these recently – it’s a new thing I’m trying out and if it doesn’t work we’ll go back to the before but for now I’ll let the author introduce this wonderful set of short stories.

A series of short, true life stories, which are the product of the travels and observations of one man. The stories are a miscellaneous collection of the funny and sad, of tragedy, love and friendship. And they are all, in a way, unexpected.  

Unexpected takes you on a journey from a Brazilian working on the oil rigs of Venezuela, who gets the shock of his life, to the uplifting story of a Chinese beggar living on the streets, entertaining passers-by with his songs and surviving through the mercy and kindness of others.  

There is a story for each of us in this book. Each one is subtly different and each carries either a message of hope for lost, or of caution for the unwary.
Unexpected is just that. Just as life is and just as the course of our lives run, at times unexpectedly.

Unexpected: Short Stories from Around the World by [Citizen One, P.F.]

 If you had to describe your book as a whole in three sentences (they can be long sentences) what would they be? 

Unexpected is a collection of true life short stories my travels around the world and the people I have met. The book features seven thought-provoking, humorous and engaging stories that end with the most unlikely twist.

What was the inspiration for the selection of short stories? Why did you decide this instead of one continuous novel?

I have learned a lot about life from listening and being kind to people, as well as from stories others have shared with me. I actively listen, and often feel like I’ve heard these stories many times before, until I realize that each story is unexpected and instructive. These experiences have inspired me to write.

I wanted to write the type of stories that I would enjoy reading: true life stories. Short stories. At first, you feel like you’ve heard these stories many times before, until you read the ending. This is true life—unexpected.

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Can you tell us more about one story?

In one of the stories, The Wedding Contract, a man who was forced to sign a pre-nuptial agreement simply because his wife was wealthy and he was considered poor. As time went on, fortunes changed and the man became far wealthier than his wife. His wife and friends dreaded the worst from him because of his new financial position but what he did next was shocking.

Finally where can my readers keep up with you and your writing? 

You can keep up with me through my website or my Facebook page:

Website

Facebook page: Unexpected by Citizen ONE

Amazon link

So there we go, a fantastic set of exciting and interest stories all with a different twist or turn to keep you intrigued. Thank you so much to this fantastic author for letting me share a little more about his book and have a fantastic middle of week break readers!

Innocent Crook by D. E Rodgers

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Hello readers, fantastic post today for you from the brilliant D.E Rodgers, and his new book The Innocent Crook! Sounds like a little bit of an oxymoron but let’s go with it! I will let Rodgers introduce the book and let you know a little more about it – so let’s get stuck in.

“Innocent Crook” is an exciting story of about Jupiter, a teenage black kid caught between his mother and aunt, and the struggle to control their drug dealing business. Jupiter’s journey, from a scared teen looking out for his younger sister to a successful high school graduate with a Harvard scholarship, will inspire and move you.

“Innocent Crook” is about overcoming your circumstances, learning that family alone doesn’t define you and that the power to succeed is in all of us. A story about love, regret, determination, forgiveness and revenge that will keep you turning the pages for an exciting and unexpected conclusion.

“Innocent Crook” was named winner at the San Francisco Book Festival and Paris Book Festival for Best Unpublished Book.

Where did you get the idea for your most recent book.

This book was a passion project. Over a long period of talking to a woman on the train to San Francisco I learned about her life in foster care. Some of her experiences were good and some were bad. Her story led me to have the same discussion with others that I knew who grew up in foster care and from those stories “Innocent Crook” was born. Though fictional “Innocent Crook” is a powerful story about a young man struggling to achieve more out of life than being a criminal.

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How do you get inspired to write? Interacting with people and hearing about the lives of others. Plus seeing movies and reading books get my creative juices flowing.

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What’s the best thing about being a writer?

Freedom of expression and freedom to be creative. I love being imaginative, thinking outside the box, and creating characters.

What’s your advice for aspiring writers?

If you are truly a writer never let someone else kill your writing dreams.

How do you deal with writer’s block?

Good question. What I do is typically stop trying to write and do something else to take my mine off of what I’m writing about. Go exercise or go play with my kids. Have fun. When the time to write again hits you return and knockout that masterpiece.

So there we go a fantastic book and a fantastic author – if you want to know more here are all the links to all of his platforms for you to take a closer look! Have a fantastic day readers!

 LINNNNNNKS 

Top Ten of the most vile bad guys (or gals) in books

Hellllllo readers , it’s Tuesday so it’s time for another Top Ten Tuesdaaaay and today we’re talking about BAD GUYS.  I, like any good reader, know that every story needs a bad guy even if it’s a very tame one. Today, however, I’m going to bring out the super bad guys – enjoy.

Nils Bjurman (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)

Nils Bjurman is a sexual sadist who manipulates and plays with the beloved Lisbeth only allowing access to her funds when she performs sexual acts. There is a terrifying rape scene and although Lisbeth does get her own back he is a utterly loathsome villain.

Napoleon (Animal Farm)

Napoeon is a proper bully isn’t he – not only does he oust the leader Snowball but he becomes the tyrannical dictator of Animal Farm. He begins to order the deaths of certain animals and ruins the tranquility that once ruled. What a nightmare.

We Know What New Book You Should Read This Faaaaaalll

We Know What New Book You Should Read This Fall

Okay, okay, excuse the use of the word fall but Buzzfeed think they can guess what book I should read so I thought I would try it out. I barely know what book I should read next especially if I was trying to make it seasonal so we’ll see. What do Buzzfeed think I should read next? 

WHere would you most enjoy spending fall?

OPTIONS: 

Seattle

Berlin

Poland

Sri Lanka

On a road trip across America 

New Jersey


I would definitely pick the road trip to America with a hella massive group of friends. I really, really, reallllly want to go to America and I think a road trip would be the best way to see as much as possible. 

WHat is your ideal fall activity?

Options: 

Playing Backgammon

Bonding with your family

Inheriting a house

Getting your life together

Meeting an old friend

Starting a new relationship

Being a part of a love triangle

Fighting for your freedom

Fighting for your survival


God that’s a lot of choice there! I think maybe sorting my life out? There’s a lot of things I need to sort out at the moment and maybe reading about other people trying to get their life together will make me feel better! 

Pick a number

208

304

352

320

368

272


whaaaaaa Buzzfeed? HOW IS THIS GOING TO HELP. Right, I’m going with 368 for no reason at all 

PICK some orchard apples


I picked this one? I don’t know why but I did.

Have some pumpkin pie


I picked this image for this question – once again no idea why.

andddddd the answer is…..

You got: “The Wangs vs. the World” by Jade Chang

Jade Chang’s debut novel “The Wangs vs. the World” follows Taiwanese-born American businessman Charles Wang, who must unite his children to start fresh in China after losing his fortune to the 2008 recession. The Wangs set off on a road trip across the country, all the way struggling to deal with their new financial situation — and each other. Highly entertaining and often laugh-out-loud funny, “The Wangs vs. the World” shows the often surprising ways hardship can bring a dysfunctional family closer together as well as what it means to be an immigrant in America today. Publication date: Oct. 4

^ So, there we go. That’s the book for me to read this fall – you can take the quiz here! Otherwise I’m off to add this to my Amazon basket.

Melody’s Key by Dallas Coryell

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Helllllo readers, hope you’re well! Another day another review. I’ve been really enjoying this slightly more relaxed schedule. It’s felt a lot more helpful for encouraging creativity and I’ve adored reading lots more books from lots more genre’s and I have a lovely YA book for you today.

“His eyes settled on her…piercing green embers of flame that revealed the ferocity of his pain and passion, yet still shrouded him under veils of ever deepening mystery that made every ounce of her ache to unravel him.”

Tegan Lockwood’s dreams were dead, sacrificed on the noble altar of duty before they ever had a chance to live. Her entire existence was disappearing into the abyss of apathy as she labored her days away keeping her family’s struggling business alive. There would be no emotion, no color, no beauty in her life. That is, until a mysterious visitor begins to draw her out of the darkness of her past towards something that will challenge the boundaries of her world, and unlock the most deeply held secrets of her heart.

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The first thing to mention is I was sent this book really nicely by the author. The story follows the life of Tegan Lockwook who is a very talented and also beautiful young girl who helps with the family business – Lockwood Holiday. Tegan is not only a talented painter but she also loves to compose and write songs and due to this she is accepted into a college in New York. Through her families financial struggles Tegan must stay with them, and put her dreams on hold. However, one summer her life is about to change forever, when American pop star Mason Keane comes to the estate, everything might be turned entirely on its head.

This is a very fun summer romance and to be honest with you I really enjoyed it. It  has a romance, it has a number of really likable an well fleshed out characters and it doesn’t follow the typical girl changes bad boy. I loved the fact that Mason is really presented as a ‘good guy.’ Mason does have struggles, he’s not perfect but the author really makes this clear at the beginning. I also adored tha the author wrote all of the songs in the book – it’s a lovely addition.

Delving into a problem I do tend to have with YA fiction, the character development throughout the book was JUST FANTASTIC. Tegan and Mason are constantly changing as individuals from the very beginning to the very end, learning not only about each other but learning about their own personalities too and the relationship DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A HEARTBEAT. I adored the fact that they built a friendship which leads to love – I won’t spoil the plot because that’s unfair but I really thought that this was a beautifully built relationship.

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This is a really tough book to review because there’s so much going on and I don’t want to spoil any of the special bits – however I loved that the plot was full of surprises. Throughout the new story there are also glimpses into the older love story (#NOSPOILERS.) There are letters from a forbidden love that takes part during WW1 and they are mixed in with the romance of the modern world. I can’t like I wish there was more into  the past love story, but that could be the historical fiction lover in me.

I think the only thing that did kind of test me was the kind of languid quite overly done descriptions. Not only did they come across a little dramatic and full of teenage angst (which is okay in small doses,) but it did make the writing a little stodgy. Through the middle of the book it does slow the pace of the book down and it does become a little slow. There are also a long of cliche’s with I’m not a big fan of (piercing eyes etc,) but I think than Dallas has written this book for the lovey-dovey one’s of us. It does have some intense descriptions, and for some readers that’a a good thing – for me a little overwhelming especially towards the end.

So, what did I think in the end. I thought that the story was really special, I thought the characters were brilliantly written, the romance was built throughout and actually happened throughout the story rather than just smushed together. I did struggle a little with the overly cliched and heavy description of the love story – it just felt a little bit over done. But if you really love a romance, with a bit of mystery, pick up a copy today.

LINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNKS

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Fighter Pilot’s Daughter: Growing Up in the Sixties and the Cold War

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Hello readers, hope you’re well I have a fantastic guest post today with Mary and her brilliant book. I hope you’re enjoying these insights into different authors and their books because they’ve all be wonderful – please leave a lovely comment below and see the links below to follow Mary’s social media platforms below!

My memoir, Fighter Pilot’s Daughter: Growing Up in the Sixties and the Cold War (Rowman and Littlefield), came out in hardback two years ago and was reissued in paperback eight months ago. I structured the “plot” of my family’s life chronologically, with the focus alternating between the larger picture of the Cold War, the more intimate dramas of our gypsy household, and the private convolutions of my own psychological development. These were very different stories, and each demanded its own kind of research.

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For the larger picture of the Cold War, I had lots of books and articles at my disposal. Studying histories of the Cold War as a professor had given me a lot of background material for the book. Spending time with the wars of the twentieth century wasn’t pleasant. Those are bloody stories for anybody, but for me they brought back memories of hard times at home. With the names—Eisenhower, Kennedy, Diem—and the places—Vietnam, Moscow, Havana—came recollections of base housing, where we waited for Dad to come home and hoped he was okay. Apart from the emotional edginess, though, this kind of research was relatively straightforward.

For the stories of my own family, the sources were more complicated. First of all, my father had never told us anything. Like other military dads then and now, he was committed to a code of secrecy about the missions he was involved in. He took those secrets to his grave. And he chose not share with my sisters and me those episodes he could relate: they were too violent or frightening in some other way that might shock our young (and girlish) ears. I have reason to think he did tell these stories to my boy cousins and perhaps to my mother; but she too was very circumspect and kept them to herself if she knew them.

What I did have from my Dad was a substantial collection of letters he wrote. And a lot of military records ended up in my mother’s files after my Dad passed away. Those provided a crucial map of the very complicated chronology of his career and definitive, if cryptic, indications of where he went and what the missions were.

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But much was missing nevertheless. My Dad was a good letter writer, but he would go for long periods of time without communicating anything. During his first tour in Vietnam, for example, there was a six-month period when we didn’t hear from him at all. My sisters and I had nightmares and my mother worried constantly. Eventually we heard from the Red Cross that he was alright. It was still a while before we heard from him directly. I describe the effects of all this on my psyche in the book, but for the purpose of building the narrative it meant I had to try to sort out the speculative from the factual in family rumors (still circulating) about where Dad was and what he was doing those months he was in the dark.

 My mother, of course, was another resource for the story of our family. She was a great story-teller. A striking character herself, she gave dramatic accounts of my Dad, his friends, the extended family, and my sisters and me as kids. But she was unreliable. She loved the story more than anything, and the truth sometimes suffered from this.I interviewed her over a period of several months—this was a few years before I wrote the memoir—and learned a great deal about our early years that I hadn’t known before. Much of it turned out to be accurate. When I checked on her versions of the larger history and her tales of my Dad’s work, however, I saw that in some instances she’d picked and chosen scenes and dialogues for their effectiveness in her story rather than as they had actually happened. I tried to make that in itself part of her portrait in Fighter Pilot’s Daughter—without dishonoring her memory.

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For the convolutions of my own psychological development, I had my girl-diaries, journals, and letters to consult. They brought back some of the crucial details of daily life in our household and in the scattered rooms and apartments I called home after leaving my parents’ care. The smells of particular kinds of paint or the odd placement of windows—these details can really bring life to a memoir, and I was grateful to my younger self for having kept a record of them.

But the greater pool of information lay in my memory banks. These in some cases were wide open, but in others not so much. For the harder memories, I had to sit with whatever I could clearly recall and wait for more to come. Sometimes it took days of going back and waiting. It was like courting somebody or, I imagine, being a therapist hoping a patient would come to see something crucial. Memories of my mother’s anger at me when I came home from college in Paris during a time when I was breaking away from the family ethics and beliefs came slow and with difficulty. What was even harder to get back was the recollection that finally emerged of her actually fearing me. She didn’t understand what influences I’d been exposed to in Paris and was frightened to know what they might mean. In the end, it was all much ado about nothing, but it was a hard picture to look at: my own mother, afraid of me.

Living in memory as continuously as I did during the writing of Fighter Pilot’s Daughter introduced a rich practice in my life. The more I remembered, the more I remembered; and writing was an important vehicle for drawing it out. The whole experience of going into the deep past of my youth has given the self-portrait I carry around with me a lot more dimension than before. On the other hand, all this the research—into the histories, letters, journals, interviews, and my own mind—not only made the book possible, but it worked like a kind of self-therapy: and a lead to several new understandings of myself as a fighter pilot’s daughter.

So there you go readers, a fantastic guest post from Mary and her fantastic book! you can use the links below to see more about the author and follow her booktastic journey! 

Links for Mary Lawlor’s Fighter Pilot’s Daughter: Growing Up in the Sixties and the Cold War

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Mary Lawlor’s website

Website Page Fighter Pilot’s Daughter

Amazon

Facebook

Goodreads

#TTT 10 books I want to listen to as audio-books

Hello readers! Hope you’re having a fantastic Tuesday and ready for another TTT. It’s a really interesting post today because I’ve been tempted to pay for audible for months now but I just don’t have a lot of time to listen. Now that I run a hell of a lot more I think it could be a good idea.

On another note if you think about listening the 1Q84 by Murakami it would take you 47 hours. #WHAAAAA. Enjoy the top ten audio books I want to listen to.

This Boy Audiobook

This Boy: a Memoir of a Childhood written and read by Alan Johnson

I started reading this book over a year ago and I just lost some steam reading it and gave up. It’s a beautiful memoir about growing up in the 50’s and the difficulties of living beneath the poverty line.  I really want to finish this.

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo Audiobook

AMY SCHUMER HAS BEEN ALL OVER THE PLACE RECENTLY and I’ve kind of stayed away but I think it’s time to read a little more from Amy Shumer and report back to lovely humans.

Spectacles Audiobook
I mean it’s Sue Perkins right? Why that hell have I not listened to this yet.
The Martian Audiobook
I utterly adored this film I’ve watched it three times and I thought it was pretty godamn fantastic. I think it would be good to listen to the book and I think because it’s pretty long it would be good for distracting me while running.
The Girl in the Ice Audiobook
The Girl in the Ice: Detective Erika Foster Crime Thriller by Robert Bryndza
Her eyes are wide open. Her lips parted as if to speak. Her dead body frozen in the ice…She is not the only one.

When a young boy discovers the body of a woman beneath a thick sheet of ice in a South London park, Detective Erika Foster is called in to lead the murder investigation.

 

^ I love Thrillers and this one does not look like it would disappoint. The cover really, really drew my eye so I thought why the hell no. 

 

The Year of Living Danishly Audiobook
The Year of Living Danishly: Uncovering the Secrets of the World’s Happiest Country by Helen Russell
Maybe I just want to be Danish? Maybe I loved Denmark. Maybe I miss Copenhagen. Maybe the yellow house drew me in. Maybe I should just shut up and reading this instead.
Mad Girl Audiobook
Mad Girl by Bryony Gordon
Bryony Gordon has OCD.

It’s the snake in her brain that has told her ever since she was a teenager that her world is about to come crashing down: that her family might die if she doesn’t repeat a phrase five times, or that she might have murdered someone and forgotten about it. It’s caused alopecia, bulimia, and drug dependency. And Bryony is sick of it.

Keeping silent about her illness has given it a cachet it simply does not deserve, so here she shares her story with trademark wit and dazzling honesty.

^ I’m reaaaaaly into memoir’s at the moment and I think this one could be quite an inspiring one? I’ll report back. 

The Rosie Project Audiobook

The Rosie Project  by Graeme Simsion

I suggested this to Mumma B and she still hasn’t read it! Due to not wanting to buy another in the same form and I want her to read it I’ll just get it on audio book and then maybe we could finally discuss a book together.

The Danish Girl Audiobook

The Danish Girl by David Ebershoff

I really wanted to see this when it came out but I really wanted to read the book first but I have so many other books to reaaaad so maybe I’ll just listen – when I can’t get up in the morning #YAWWWWWWN

One Hundred Days of Happiness Audiobook

One Hundred Days of Happiness by Fausto Brizzi

What would you do if you knew you only had 100 days left to live? For Lucio Battistini, it’s a chance to spend the rest of his life the way he always should have—by making every moment count.

^ This a book for when I want to cry whilst I’m out running because this seem uber sad but utterly beautiful – PROBABLY. 

So there you go,  ten books I would like. Also T if you’re there maybe you could just buy me an audible subscriptions  forever? Thank you.