7 Keys to a journey of personal growth.

-If you're losing your soul and you know it, then you've still got a soul left to lose- — Charles Bukowski

Everyone deals with personal growth and happiness in different ways. Some individuals experience road blocks that have the greatest effect on the ability to create positive change. Others recognize the road blocks and obtain appropriate tools to help them move beyond inner confusion. Throughout my career as a professional motivational speaker in the field of Spiritual Psychology and Social Services, I have been able to help individuals to effectively deal with the challenges faced and identify their personal road blocks and apply seven keys to move forward toward their personal growth and happiness. Here are my seven keys:

Live Happier: It’s so important to acknowledge that we all need Love to keep stress at a minimum. Conscious loving releases endorphins in your brain and the simple act of forgiveness works as a natural anti-depressant.

Positive Attitude: Choosing forgiveness sets the heart free to embrace more loving. As much as our bodies need rest, so do our hearts. It’s important to take time to meditate to help with your life’s challenges.

Personal Goal Setting: What are you really called to do in this life time? Set goals that serve your highest purpose. Don’t just be good, you can be great!

Meditation Techniques: Sit quietly and listen to your mind. Then tell your mind to be quiet. Let you soul be the lead in the conversation. This will help give you calming and pleasurable feelings.

-If you're losing your soul and you know it, then you've still got a soul left to lose- — Charles Bukowski (1)

Realizing Your Potential: One of the few industries that thrive is “fear”… There’s a reason for that. Fear calls people to action, but so does Love. Whether a new birth, a wedding or a goal achieved … loving generates more love. I recommend aligning your goals with what is true to your heart! Uplifting events will occur naturally.

Developing Healthier Thoughts: Science has proven the conscious loving releases positive endorphins. Think about how you can love more each day.

Trust Love: Get in the conversation. Ask questions. Seek answers. Find the next level on your path to creating move love in your life.

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The release of my new audio book “The ABC’s Of Loving Each Day: A Journey to Personal Growth and Happiness” is an expert guide to help gain a better perspective on life. To listen to this audio book, visit online at www.soundcloud.com/dr-see-love/sets/the-abcs-of-loving-each-day. For more information please call 424-226-8772 or email me at connect@drseelove.com or visit my website at www.DrSeeLove.com

Guest post from Adrian Harvey, courtesy of Urbane Publications

Afternoon readers, hope you are having a lovely day. Today a little guest post from the rather lovely Adrian Harvey; I reviewed his book back in June which you can read here. I truly enjoyed this book, however, this is a little explanation of the thoughts behind the book and a lovely read for a slow Thursday in the office.

 Things are seldom as they seem….

Inspiration comes from many places and in all shapes and sizes. In my case, it came from India, in the hefty form of an elephant. That elephant was long dead, and I never had the chance to meet him. It also turned out that he wasn’t even real. But his story was the starting point of my novel, Being Someone. Quite literally, in the sense that a version of it became the first chapter, but the elephant was also the inspiration for everything that followed. The elephant, who I called Iravatha, was both the starting point and the frame for the novel, and he keeps poking his very long nose into the story.

In the book, the story of Iravatha is told to the narrator in a little park in the middle of Mysore and, to all intents and purposes, it is the same story that was told to me a little park in the middle of Mysore, some seven years ago. Essentially, it is an Indian version of the story of Greyfriar’s Bobby. If you don’t know the story, it’s the ‘true’ story of a little dog – Bobby no less – who keeps returning to the grave of his dead master in an Edinburgh church yard. There’s a Disney movie, made in the sixties, about the tale. It’s very touching.

When I got back to London I checked and there was no Iravatha. The boy I had met in Mysore had been telling stories, conflating bits and pieces of truth to create an impression, an effect. And it worked; I liked it. But what attracted me most to it was the ambiguity in its apparent simplicity and honesty.

You see, there is an account of Greyfriar’s Bobby that suggests that, rather than a heart warming account of loyalty and enduring love, it was simply a wheeze dreamed up to attract tourists to Edinburgh and in fact – a little like Lassie – a number of different dogs played the role over the years. Other versions suggest that ‘Bobby’ was just one of a number of stray dogs that hung around the cemeteries of the city, waiting for the highly emotional human visitors, who would feed them.

Now, the relationship between a mahout and his elephant is deep, often lifelong. But it is also complex and problematic. Mahouts are seldom entirely kind to the animals they train and tend and, as we know, elephants have very long memories within which to hold their grudges. I started to play with the layers of truth that might be bound up with my elephant story and, for some reason, this ambiguity made me think about a marriage.

So Being Someone became a love story: a man – let’s call him James – and a woman – let’s call her Lainey – fall in love; they get married, and then things happen, as things so often insist on doing.

But I also wanted to write a story about how hard it is to know each other, much less ourselves; a story about the elusiveness of the self. The result, I hope – and with only a little embarrassment – is an existential love story. With an elephant.

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