Medium has become a big part of my life. (Reading wise.)

It’s the website I check in most too each morning. There’s always something to get stuck into. Always something to read. I wrote a post when I had just started exploring the mammoth of writing there is on Medium. I’m a little more tuned into Medium now and I’ve been scouting about for the BEST reads. Here are 5 more I certainly recommend.

Vomit, bleeding nipples, and hallucinations on a 150-mile running race

I LOVE READING ABOUT RUNNING.

Over the last 12 months I’ve convinced myself there’s 3 extreme walks/runs I need to do. This may or not have been inspired by the film Wild. (Sorry not sorry.) This article is all about running the Spartathlon as part of the grand tradition and fascination with classical Greece. It’s a stunningly written article that I loved reading. It also makes me mad my knees fail to work (most of the time.)

A statistical analysis of the art on convicts’ bodies

Tattoo’s are another thing I’m fascinated by. I’ve wanted one since I was sixteen, but never had the conviction to pick one. I know I only want one, so I’ve got to make it the right decision. (ONE DAY.)

This article delves into the data of prisoners with/without tattoos and how that correlates to the crime committed. It’s a really analytical but interesting look into how tattoos affect and influence certain crimes. It also discusses tattoo removal, and whether criminals are likely to re-offend based on their tattoos, but with real figures. It is a long article, but make a cuppa and read all the way through.

What Running My First Triathlon Taught Me About Life

11 unexpectedly meaningful life lessons from an impulsive decision.

I was just going to say read anything by @tre but this one might have been my favourite. (Slowly followed by his essay on fasting.) Tre’s writing is beautifully detailed and exploratory of how his first Triathlon taught him a hella lot of things. The writing is fun and full of humour but it taught me a lot. Tre assigns each of the things he’s learnt into a way you can improve/learn from him:

4. Action informs theory.
Whenever we are in the process of starting something new, it’s dangerously easy to get caught up in the research, tools, techniques and methods,
“This meditation thing looks cool. Let me just download 23 apps and read these 5 books and 9 articles first.” 3 days later… “Fuck. It’s too much.” *Rage results to Netflix and Ben & Jerry’s (peanut butter cups btw)*
Tre looks into ways that you can put his understanding into practice:
Takeaway:
We need to cultivate a default bias towards action, because everything else in the process serves as a multiplier of the effect of taking action.
From trying out new things, you gain a whole new layer of contextual knowledge, which you can then combine with the theoretical knowledge to build an informed perspective and approach towards the activity at hand.

There are 11 lessons to learn, read them all.

“No-Spend November”: A Social Experiment

This essay follows Sophia as she attempts to maintain a social calendar without spending money on anything that she didn’t want. Struggling with consensus that you have to spend money to hang out with people Sophia puts her foot down. I hate spending unnecessary money too; during the Winter if you want to sit with a friend why do you need to buy a coffee? WHERE DO PEOPLE GO. Sophia details her experiment beautifully. All her writing is stunning to boot.

The Cost of Putting Down My Cat

Just read this. (Makes cry faces.)

There you have it 5 more articles I know you should read from Medium.

Have you read anything reaaaally good online recently?

You might have guessed I’m a big reader.

Give me a rainy day, and I’ll read till I’m blue in the face. Or until I’ve read all of the words. As many words as my tiny brain can take in. But, I don’t just read fiction. I read A LOT of articles. I’ve always read Narratively, but recently I discovered Medium.

Read Medium, get smarter

Welcome to Medium, a place where everyone has a story to share and the best ones are delivered right to you.

^ Best description. Better than I could come up with. (I tried to re-write it, I couldn’t.)

Every day thousands of people turn to Medium to publish their ideas and perspectives. They might be personal essays, they might talk about tech. They might be 21 minutes long they might be 3. It’s a new type of news, that comes straight from the people living and making it. And it’s bloody beautiful. Here are 5 articles you need to read. (Because they’re brilliant.)

Medium Articles

‘It’s Because You’re Fat’ — And Other Lies My Doctors Told Me

This article really struck a chord with me. I’ve struggled in the past with PCOS. Too many times I’ve been told to lose weight. It will solve all ills. Needless to say at the time of my PCOS diagnosis I had lost 20lbs and was at a healthy BMI. (Shrugs – explain that.) Martina’s story has made me think about people that have more destructive illnesses that could be gravely misdiagnosed because of prejudice towards weight. It’s not cool and needs to stop.

Cooking with Sarah

This series is fantastic. It’s all about sharing the joy of cooking with your partner. Both Sarah and her partner Aaron have profiles and they have created a very special slice of the Internet in the process. Sarah tends to write the recipe, Aaron tells you the reasons behind it. It’s a two step story and it’s wonderfully done. The posts end up being a mixture of learning to live in the midst of being a couple and some really  bladdy good recipes. I’ve signed up for updates from both. (You should too.)

This is what I want for losing weight

I’ve recently lost 24lbs and counting for the second/third time. (Yes I am a yoyo dieter.) This article talks about rewarding yourself for hitting certain weight-loss goals. Not in food treats (step away from that treat day.) But, in tangible things. A lipstick maybe? A trip away. It’s a positive post about self-love and coping with your body.

I wanted to see how far I could push myself creatively. So I redesigned Instagram.

FOR MY GEEKY GALS. I love Instagram. It’s a recent love and I’m currently trying to post once a day. But I have discovered SOME faults. Kim went a step further and decided to redesign Instagram and I like what she suggested. One of the things I love about Medium is how it encourages us to think more about what we could do. How could we push ourselves to develop our skills. After reading this post I saw that 3 people had taken inspiration from Kim and had written/designed their own improvements to Instagram. Medium creates an ever-moving discussion.

6 non-intuitive lessons I learned from living on Airbnb for 365 days

Finally a bit of fun (and something I now really want to do.) Chenyu lived in AirBnb’s for a year. I’ve done one in my lifetime (SO FAR,) and do definitely want to learn more. I love how this article is constructed. Plus, it’s seriously increased my travel bug. Ergh I wanna go now.

Do you use Medium? If not here’s 5 to get you started! (And if you know any good articles, link a gal up.) 

Medium Articles

Medium Articles

I am slowly falling back in love with my Kindle.

Physical copies of books are the bomb, but they take up a lot of room. Especially if you read close to 100 books a year. I’m 23 – 2300 books is too many to store. The Kindle is definitely a method of space control. Oh, and it’s tangerine coloured which is also cool. This is one one of the first books I downloaded on my new Kindle and it’s a stunner. Shall we dive in? (Or surf in?)

The Wave at Hanging Rock

Blurb

Jesse tells the story of his coming-of-age on the wild Atlantic coast, where he fails to notice the disturbing behaviour of his best friend.

Natalie’s husband goes missing at sea in circumstances which don’t make sense. And while she searches for him, it seems she also has something to hide.

You’ll be shocked at how Jesse and Natalie’s stories come crashing together. And at the end, you won’t see the twist coming.

The Wave at Hanging Rock is a powerful and intelligent thriller that will grip you from the first line, and keep you guessing till the very last page.

The Wave at Hanging Rock

My Review

The book follows two seemingly unrelated stories. Jesse and his friends surfing in sublime Wales and Natalie a psychologist whose husband has oddly disappeared. We follow the first person perspective from Jesse during childhood. He spends most of his days surfing with Darren and John. Fishing for crabs and fighting for the best waves. Natalie’s story is told from the present. After her husband fails to arrive home she continues her life the best she can. Only for eight years later the disappearance of Jim raises its ugly head. Jesse and Natalie’s are about to collide and there’s nothing to stop it.

The writing is dark and foreboding. The sections of surfing really drew me into the writing and are writtrn really well. Throughout it has an intense feeling – Jesse has a cloudy and murky personality. John and Darren also have quirks. Darren struggles to keep up with the other two and John is downright terrifying. His dominating personality kept me on edge throughout. All of the character dialogue was written well – it felt real which I liked. Natalie’s character is well built too. She has bite and drive but also a vulnerability. The transitions from present to past work well and don’t jar. Thumbs up there.

At the beginning it’s slow read and takes time to build speed but it builds. The second half of the book I galloped through and found myself desperate to get to the end. The ending will probably upset you – it has many on Goodreads. I’m going to let you decide whether it works. (But let me know in the comments.)

The Wave at Hanging Rock

Final Thoughts

This is a dark psychological thriller. It will keep you second guessing and trying to put your finger on the final ending. The characters are dark and brutal but ultimately likeable. I definitely want to read into this author more. He’s one to watch I think.

Goodreads Amazon 

You might have seen recently that I’ve fallen for the Pigeonhole App. I wrote about it a little here and here. Today I’m reviewing a book from their disappearing stave collection. There’s a post about the concept and my experience with that coming Friday. But today I take you into the chilling book All the missing girls by Megan Miranda

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

Blurb

It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.

The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.

But here’s the thing I’ve learned about leaving – you can’t really go back. I don’t know what to do with Cooley Ridge anymore and Cooley Ridge doesn’t know what to do with me, either. The distance only increases with the years.

My Review

After the initial set-up of the story, All the missing Girls is told backwards. We start from Day 15 and go back to Day 1 following Nic’s return to her old home. She attempts to unravel in these what has happened to Annaleise, and Corinne all those years ago. Nic must also come to terms with the secrets her family have kept hidden whilst protecting them too.

The book kept me hooked from start to finish. Telling the tale backwards means that you have work out the references without the build-up to an event. Then you read what actually happened before in the next (previous) chapter. Throughout Megan Miranda doesn’t miss a beat. I was second guessing myself through the reading, trying to pick through the lies and work out the truth. At times I struggled to trust Nic as a narrator making the reading more haphazard. (This is mentioned at the beginning but when I reading I try to find a credible source.)

A polaroid fading from the edges in, the colors bled out; the outline of a ghost town full of ghosts.

The writing is claustrophobic and dense. It has a magical, woven sense of style and I devoured it. It’s blustery and free-spirited but always with a sense of danger. I have a feeling I will buying everything and anything this author writes.

“The woods have eyes and monsters and stories. We are them as much as they are us.”

The characters are fantastically written. Tyler the ex-boyfriend who was/is always there for Nic. Trusting but also cold he was a favourite of mine. Nic can be a struggle to empathise with but as I threw myself deeper into the rabbit hole I wanted it to all be okay. Her ailing father, closed off brother it’s an infuriating and exciting mess. The flashbacks to the group ten years ago tell of a dangerously intense female friendships that left me gripping the edge of the book.

The biggest credit to this book was I constantly judged every character I came across. I was toying and frowing as to who I thought had done it. Towards the end I managed to stumble on a conclusion but I didn’t quite get it. The execution is spot on. I want to go back and read this the other way round – but I’m not ready to yet. The initial excitement of reading this hasn’t worn off. The ending is brilliant too – maybe there are monsters in all of us. That’s all I’m saying.

Final Thoughts

It’s better than Gone Girl, and The Girl on the Train. It’s sublime. GO get it.

GoodreadsAmazon 

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

I’ve always struggled with series books. The Fire Within is no different.

I was bought this book years ago when I was a child. I read though it in a whirlwind but. But only read book one. I’ve read the book mebbe 4/5 times but I’ve never read further into the series. I read a lot more serious books recently. (LOL adulthood.) But I thought I might start a series feature – beginning with The Fire Within. Let me know whether that’s exciting (OR TOTES NOT. )

Blurb

When David moves in with Elizabeth Pennykettle and her eleven-year-old daughter, Lucy, he discovers a collection of clay dragons that come to life. David’s own special dragon inspires him to write a story, which reveals the secrets behind a mystery.

In order to solve the mystery and save his dragon, David must master the magic of the fire within—not only with his hands but also with his heart.

The Fire Within by Chris D'Lacey

My Review

The book follows the David arrival at Wayward Cresent. He’s come to study Geography at the local college and rent a small room. But, once he arrives and meets Liz and Lucy Pennykettle he senses something isn’t quite right. His landlord Liz creates clay dragons for a living, and Lucy is her daughter who adores squirrels. But something is off.  For a start – he can hear a hrrrrr-ing noise. It turns out the clay dragons are kinda real. But I’ll let you read and find out more.

The book is an interweaving of three stories. The story being told and the re-telling of the story of the last dragon. But, David is also roped into writing a birthday story for Lucy for her birthday. It features a squirrel called Conker. Super cute. All interweave perfectly. They support one another and help to keep the writing free-flowing. As always I preferred one over the two. The story of the dragons pipped it for me. Many of the negative comments focus on the squirrel story feeling it overshadows. I don’t think it does really.

The novel definitely has a strong sense of innocence. It is a beautiful mix of nature and fantasy and real concern for the environment. Yes, relationships are built very quickly and dissolved very quickly. Lucy and the lodger make friends in the wink of an eye. There’s an evil crow that is instantly recognisable. It’s sweet. Oh, and you should never made your dragon cry.

It also desperately made want my own Liz dragon. They’re moulded on the personality traits of their owner. Mine would be holding a book, with a pencil (like David’s.) With maybe a can of Pepsi Max and a tube of Pringles? Classy.

Final Thoughts

This book is a fantastic mix of nature quests, fantasy, art and writing. The layers of the story will intrigue eager readers but also reluctant readers. It will inspire anyone that reads this book to look for more.

Amazon Goodreads 

The Fire Within by Chris D'Lacey

The Fire Within by Chris D'Lacey