I’m really pleased with the photographs of these books today. Must admit I’m not the greatest photographer but I snapped these on the train home recently. I’m kinda super proud of them. The tale inside though is filled with pain, hurt, disgust, human destruction and perseverance. I’m going to try to do it justice. I probably won’t so just read the book.

Blurb

When the Nazis invaded Hungary in 1944, they sent virtually the entire Jewish population to Auschwitz. A Jew and a medical doctor, the prisoner Dr. Miklos Nyiszli was spared death for a grimmer fate: to perform “scientific research” on his fellow inmates under the supervision of the man who became known as the infamous “Angel of Death” – Dr. Josef Mengele.

Nyiszli was named Mengele’s personal research pathologist. In that capactity he also served as physician to the Sonderkommando, the Jewish prisoners who worked exclusively in the crematoriums and were routinely executed after four months. Miraculously, Nyiszli survived to give this horrifying and sobering account.

My Review

Auschwitz A Doctor’s Eyewitess Account by Dr. Mik­lós Nyis­zli is a non-fiction memoir of a Jewish Hungarian Medical Doctor who performed research on other Jews under Dr. Josef Mengele also known as the ‘Angel of Death.’ Not an easy read but a super super important one.

Mik­lós was sent to Auschwitz when the Nazi invaded Hungary in 1994 but was picked by Mengele to perform scientific research on inmates. He later became Mengele’s personal research pathologist. Surviving the war  but having to live with knowledge that you’ve helped one of the biggest criminals is a struggle Mik­lós constantly discusses.

Dr Nyiszli describes the terrible things he’s seen and done and stories he’s witnessed. The horrors of the gas chambers. (There is a terrifying account of girl that survives the chamber only to be brought back to life to then be shot immediately) The stories of the twelfth Sonderkommando, the Jews who had to work in the crematoria (something I hadn’t known) and revolted before being brutally murdered. The Nazi’s replaced the Sonderkommando every four months. The new Sonderkommando getting rid of the bodies from the previous group; it will later be their turn. (Horrendous.)

A comment on the style?

There’s a little controversy as to the clinical telling of  Dr. Nyiszli’s experience. I don’t think we can really comment from our comfortable lives. Yes the writing is cold, but if Dr. Nyiszli’s had poured his heart out, maybe he wouldn’t have survived. It is a clinical telling from a doctor who wanted to get down on paper what the horrors he personally experienced. Yes there are no surviving witnesses that can corroborate the story, but this is a story of survival. What would any of us have done in his place.

Final Thoughts

This book was a struggle to read but one I’m glad to have. It’s like nothing I’ve read before about the experiences at Auschwitz and I definitely recommend it.

GoodreadsAmazon 

In other news, which I’ve mentioned earlier, I joined a book club!

If you’re in the Greenwich area and love books I would definitely recommend joining us. We meet the first Wednesday of the month and read a different book each month. Whether you loved or hated the book there’s always something to discuss. The Last Weekend was the book of choice the first week I attended the book club. This is what I thought.

Blurb

Set over a long weekend, Blake Morrison’s new novel is a taut, atmospheric, brilliantly chilling story of a rivalrous friendship – as told by Ian, the deceptively casual narrator.

It opens with a surprise phone call from an old university friend, inviting Ian and his wife, Em, for a few days by the sea. Their hosts, Ollie and Daisy, are a glamorous couple. And the scene is set for sunlit relaxation and cheerful reminiscence. But dangerous tensions quickly emerge.

In vivid, careful prose, Blake Morrison perfectly conveys the stifling atmosphere of a remote cottage in the hottest days of summer. Troubling revelations from Ian’s past slowly intrude. And his rivalry with Ollie intensifies as they resurrect a seemingly forgotten bet made twenty years before. Each day becomes a series of challenges for higher and higher stakes, setting in motion actions that will have irreversible consequences.

My Review

This review might be tough to write because I’m still on the fence as to how much I liked it. The book is a tense and fast-moving book told following the events of a long weekend in the life of four friends. First there’s Ollie and Daisy, the golden couple. They invite Ian and Em (the poorer, less golden couple) to a remote country lodge for a brief holiday. As the weekend progresses, old rivalries surface as the two old university friends Ian and Ollie interact. It leads to a dark, chilling, ending.

First things first, Ian is an incredibly unreliable narrator. At the beginning of the book I liked his easy nature but as the book progresses his character crosses the line. He’s a devious, manipulative and delusional liar. His obsession with Daisy comes full-force and we find that he is capable of horrible, horrible things. (I’ll let you discover them.) Daisy is a a waif like character and I wish we had learnt more about her. Her dreams, her fears, her expectations. Em the same – we don’t quite get the full picture, but I think this is to expose Ian’s unstable nature.

The whole holiday is an utter car crash that I couldn’t stop looking at. But was also sickened by what was happening/what I was seeing. Throughout the book Ian and Ollie compete to honor an old bet. A range of sporting challenges which are played for bigger and better stakes. Ian, the poorer friend feels a sense of social inferiority to his richer, more successful friend, which is magnified by his gambling addiction (kept secret from their friends.) There’s a definite sense of an unsettled score and a childishness to the rivalry between the two men.

Final Thoughts

The book does have problems. The ending is very formulaic and predictable. Daisy and Ollie have a son that comes on the holiday but dissapears frequently. We never learn where he’s been and he never really adds anything  the book. There’s also a discussion of Ollie visiting the lodge as a boy. It’s never revealed whether Ollie was lying. Other bits and pieces in the book that seem pivotal are never discussed. It’s frustrating.

The writing is playful and well-written. As Ian’s personality bubbles and becomes more unstable, we see Ollie and Daisy react but never get the release we need. The twist (if you can call it at the end,) is very well done, just not quite the ending I wanted.

Read ‘The Last Weekend’ for the shock factor, and the beautiful McEwan style writing but it’s not perfect.

AmazonGoodreads 

 

If you don’t like the F word maybe don’t read on.

See, the Thug Kitchen book is like nothing I’ve read before. Vegan recipe with bite might be the best description.

Thug Kitchen recipe book

Blurb

Thug Kitchen started their wildly popular website to inspire people to eat some Goddamn vegetables and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow (‘This might be my favorite thing ever’) and with half a million Facebook fans and counting, Thug Kitchen wants to show everyone how to take charge of their plates and cook up some real f*cking food.

Yeah, plenty of blogs and cookbooks preach about how to eat more kale, why ginger fights inflammation, and how to cook with microgreens and nettles. But they are dull or pretentious as hell -and most people can’t afford the hype.

Thug Kitchen lives in the real world. In their first cookbook, they’re throwing down more than 100 recipes for their best-loved meals, snacks and sides for beginning cooks to home chefs. (Roasted Beer and Lime Cauliflower Tacos? Pumpkin Chili? Grilled Peach Salsa? Believe that sh*t.) Plus they’re going to arm you with all the info and techniques you need to shop on a budget and go and kick a bunch of ass on your own.

This book is an invitation to everyone who wants to do better to elevate their kitchen game. No more ketchup and pizza counting as vegetables. No more avoiding the produce corner of the supermarket. Sh*t is about to get real.

My Review

This book really took me by surprise. The extreme profanity is woven throughout out the book. It’s a big concept  and it’s a lot of fun. It’s definitely found a niche in the market. Yes it might turn some people off, but I liked the contrast because this is a vegan cookbook. I think veganism has a bad rep for being a little, nice? But this takes it to another level. Love it.

The recipes are split into six sections, each with an equally rude name. But basically, we have breakfasts, lunches (salads and sandwiches,) stews, munchies (salsa, snacks) mains, and motherfucking desserts. Yes, it’s actually called that. The recipes are fantastic. Favourites include baked spanish rice, pozole rojo, and creamy ravioli with house marinara.

They are in American cup sizes which can be confusing but a quick google will help.

I love the bowl recipes. The idea is you pick a grain or starch, then add vegetables, a protein, and a sauce or dressing. The book then lists combos from the book, from different sections to help you out (with helpful page numbers and whether it’s a veggie, protein etc.) It’s a wonderful way of making the book more versatile. Yes you could make quick pickled vegetables and serve it with your own recipe, or helpfully you could mix it with sweet citrus baked tofu and make a bowl. The book becomes a lot more personal.

The book doesn’t just do recipes it also breaks down different ways of cooking an ingredient. Tofu is something T and I have struggled to cook at times. The book has two pages that give different marinades, and different ways of baking the tofu. It’s really helpful. There’s also a page on how to make a vegetable broth which is used in numerous recipes. Which again was V helpful .

Additionally any confusing ingredients have a *, (****) depending on how many confusing ingredients there are. It might link to another recipe or explain other ingredients you could use. It’s brilliant. So instead of teaspoon oil you could use coconut/grape seed/olive oil. Wonderful.

Final Thoughts

It’s a bloody brilliant book. If you’re vegan definitely buy it. If you want to try cut out a little meat definitely buy it. It’s a wonderful book for mixing up what you make in the kitchen!

Thug Kitchen recipe book

Thug Kitchen recipe book

 

 

 

I’ve been reading a lot of books recently and a couple have really stood out. Like this one.

Want to give a quick shout-out to Pigeonhole. I tried to download the book after it had finished it’s serialisation.  But the app was letting me download it but it never appeared in my bookshelf. I shouldn’t have been able to get hold of it, but Pigeonhole let me because they are wonderful. This is what I thought of Lies by T.M Logan.

Blurb

 When Joe Lynch stumbles across his wife driving into a hotel car park while she’s supposed to be at work, he’s intrigued enough to follow her in.

And when he witnesses her in an angry altercation with family friend Ben, he knows he ought to intervene.

But just as the confrontation between the two men turns violent, and Ben is knocked unconscious, Joe’s young son has an asthma attack – and Joe must flee in order to help him.

When he returns, desperate to make sure Ben is OK, Joe is horrified to find that Ben has disappeared.

And that’s when Joe receives the first message . . .

My Review

Sometimes, secrets are best kept that way.

T M Logan’s debut novel ‘Lies revolves around the decisive moment where everything changes, when you find out something you didn’t want to know. The YES or NO choice that seems harmless but causes your life to dissolve into hell. Well maybe.

Joe Lynch is pretty normal. He has a lovely wife and an adorable son, and a normal job as a teacher. He spends his days pottering around doing all-together adult things. Until one day his son spots his mum’s car, somewhere where it shouldn’t really be. Following his wife Mel he finds her with their friend Ben at a hotel. From this moment everything begins to collapse. It looks like Joe is going to be arrested on suspicion of murder and he quickly realises he doesn’t know his wife, Mel, at all.

Character wise I loved Joe. Yes, he’s very naive, yes it takes him a long time to catch on but that’s why he’s so great. The trial by social media that he is forced to withstand is excruciating. Ben, (as described in the blurb,) dissapears but not for long. He taunts Joe, leading him deeper into the hell hole that’s been created. I wanted Joe to succeed, especially as he gets more and more desperate.

The writing is exceptional. It’s not gritty, but it is very engaging and clean writing with bite. The demise of Joe is wonderfully done. I felt like throwing the book on the floor a number of times. It’s not often that a book manages to make me desperate to read and piss me off at the same time. The writing is very cat and mouse, back and forth.

Final Thoughts

Overall, a super good read. I would say the ending was a brilliant twist but a little over the top. Saying that I didn’t guess it at all and was very, very shocked. If you love a thriller definitely get a copy. Thumbs up.

Medium has become a big part of my life. (Reading wise.)

It’s the website I check in most too each morning. There’s always something to get stuck into. Always something to read. I wrote a post when I had just started exploring the mammoth of writing there is on Medium. I’m a little more tuned into Medium now and I’ve been scouting about for the BEST reads. Here are 5 more I certainly recommend.

Vomit, bleeding nipples, and hallucinations on a 150-mile running race

I LOVE READING ABOUT RUNNING.

Over the last 12 months I’ve convinced myself there’s 3 extreme walks/runs I need to do. This may or not have been inspired by the film Wild. (Sorry not sorry.) This article is all about running the Spartathlon as part of the grand tradition and fascination with classical Greece. It’s a stunningly written article that I loved reading. It also makes me mad my knees fail to work (most of the time.)

A statistical analysis of the art on convicts’ bodies

Tattoo’s are another thing I’m fascinated by. I’ve wanted one since I was sixteen, but never had the conviction to pick one. I know I only want one, so I’ve got to make it the right decision. (ONE DAY.)

This article delves into the data of prisoners with/without tattoos and how that correlates to the crime committed. It’s a really analytical but interesting look into how tattoos affect and influence certain crimes. It also discusses tattoo removal, and whether criminals are likely to re-offend based on their tattoos, but with real figures. It is a long article, but make a cuppa and read all the way through.

What Running My First Triathlon Taught Me About Life

11 unexpectedly meaningful life lessons from an impulsive decision.

I was just going to say read anything by @tre but this one might have been my favourite. (Slowly followed by his essay on fasting.) Tre’s writing is beautifully detailed and exploratory of how his first Triathlon taught him a hella lot of things. The writing is fun and full of humour but it taught me a lot. Tre assigns each of the things he’s learnt into a way you can improve/learn from him:

4. Action informs theory.
Whenever we are in the process of starting something new, it’s dangerously easy to get caught up in the research, tools, techniques and methods,
“This meditation thing looks cool. Let me just download 23 apps and read these 5 books and 9 articles first.” 3 days later… “Fuck. It’s too much.” *Rage results to Netflix and Ben & Jerry’s (peanut butter cups btw)*
Tre looks into ways that you can put his understanding into practice:
Takeaway:
We need to cultivate a default bias towards action, because everything else in the process serves as a multiplier of the effect of taking action.
From trying out new things, you gain a whole new layer of contextual knowledge, which you can then combine with the theoretical knowledge to build an informed perspective and approach towards the activity at hand.

There are 11 lessons to learn, read them all.

“No-Spend November”: A Social Experiment

This essay follows Sophia as she attempts to maintain a social calendar without spending money on anything that she didn’t want. Struggling with consensus that you have to spend money to hang out with people Sophia puts her foot down. I hate spending unnecessary money too; during the Winter if you want to sit with a friend why do you need to buy a coffee? WHERE DO PEOPLE GO. Sophia details her experiment beautifully. All her writing is stunning to boot.

The Cost of Putting Down My Cat

Just read this. (Makes cry faces.)

There you have it 5 more articles I know you should read from Medium.

Have you read anything reaaaally good online recently?