Auschwitz: A Doctor’s Eyewitness Account by Miklós Nyiszli

I’m really pleased with the photographs of these books today. Must admit I’m not the greatest photographer but I snapped these on the train home recently. I’m kinda super proud of them. The tale inside though is filled with pain, hurt, disgust, human destruction and perseverance. I’m going to try to do it justice. I probably won’t so just read the book.

Blurb

When the Nazis invaded Hungary in 1944, they sent virtually the entire Jewish population to Auschwitz. A Jew and a medical doctor, the prisoner Dr. Miklos Nyiszli was spared death for a grimmer fate: to perform “scientific research” on his fellow inmates under the supervision of the man who became known as the infamous “Angel of Death” – Dr. Josef Mengele.

Nyiszli was named Mengele’s personal research pathologist. In that capactity he also served as physician to the Sonderkommando, the Jewish prisoners who worked exclusively in the crematoriums and were routinely executed after four months. Miraculously, Nyiszli survived to give this horrifying and sobering account.

My Review

Auschwitz A Doctor’s Eyewitess Account by Dr. Mik­lós Nyis­zli is a non-fiction memoir of a Jewish Hungarian Medical Doctor who performed research on other Jews under Dr. Josef Mengele also known as the ‘Angel of Death.’ Not an easy read but a super super important one.

Mik­lós was sent to Auschwitz when the Nazi invaded Hungary in 1994 but was picked by Mengele to perform scientific research on inmates. He later became Mengele’s personal research pathologist. Surviving the war  but having to live with knowledge that you’ve helped one of the biggest criminals is a struggle Mik­lós constantly discusses.

Dr Nyiszli describes the terrible things he’s seen and done and stories he’s witnessed. The horrors of the gas chambers. (There is a terrifying account of girl that survives the chamber only to be brought back to life to then be shot immediately) The stories of the twelfth Sonderkommando, the Jews who had to work in the crematoria (something I hadn’t known) and revolted before being brutally murdered. The Nazi’s replaced the Sonderkommando every four months. The new Sonderkommando getting rid of the bodies from the previous group; it will later be their turn. (Horrendous.)

A comment on the style?

There’s a little controversy as to the clinical telling of  Dr. Nyiszli’s experience. I don’t think we can really comment from our comfortable lives. Yes the writing is cold, but if Dr. Nyiszli’s had poured his heart out, maybe he wouldn’t have survived. It is a clinical telling from a doctor who wanted to get down on paper what the horrors he personally experienced. Yes there are no surviving witnesses that can corroborate the story, but this is a story of survival. What would any of us have done in his place.

Final Thoughts

This book was a struggle to read but one I’m glad to have. It’s like nothing I’ve read before about the experiences at Auschwitz and I definitely recommend it.

GoodreadsAmazon 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *