Lush in Translation by Aimee Horton

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Helllllo readers, hope you’re well! I’ve been reading a hell of a lot of fun books recently because I’m worried that reading something toooooo serious will kill off my want to read at all. But fun stories are good for me and this one seemed like the perfect  read for little ole me. I got a hold of this copy after subscribing to a blog which is something I haven’t done before – without further delay onto the review.

Find out just how British Dottie is…

Dottie Harris is as British as they come, which is exactly what endears her to us. But when her pregnant American cousin comes for a visit, Dottie is a frazzled disaster who can’t seem to overcome the language barrier.

Lush in Translation is a funny look at parenting from both sides of the pond, and the surprising number of confusing language differences that entails.

So, plot time – the book follows the routine of busy working woman Dottie Harris who has gone from working woman to full on Mummy. Battling little ones her days are filled whizzing around wiping noses and finding shoes. Although things aren’t exactly what she was expected she’s adjusting to life. One day though, her expecting cousin from across the pond comes to stay and let’s just say there’s a bit of a language barrier and a bit of difference in expectations but the story follows the differences between the two and the little quirks and ideas about parenting.

This is a very short story but it’s a fun story – we see the quirks and confusion in the changes of language between the two. The confusion when the words nappies (diapers) sweets (candy) and dummies (pacifiers) are used. Throughout we see Dottie desperate to impress and as she attempts to bribe her children into behaving she starts to struggle with keeping up appearances.  The story continues to play out between the two women and we get to see the thought process that no matter where we’re from, the ideas we have, the life we decide to lead and the way we parent we are really just the same people underneath. Parenting comes  in all different styles and we each have our own way of doing it.

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In terms of the writing style it’s very very simple;  there’s very little description or character build up and there isn’t a lot into the characters. We don’t really get a description of Dottie other than she’s very British and likes a gin and tonic or too every so often. Her cousin is the same and that’s the real problem of the book it’s just too short. It is sold as a snapshot into her life but it definitely could have been worked into a longer tale. All of these comments will revolve around it being too short but there was just very little space in the scenes, almost each was told in a  just sentence which made it difficult to really get involved in.

The ending also was really disappointing because we just know so little about the characters it’s difficult to feel anything at the end of the book. I love short stories and I know T doesn’t because they so rarely deliver and recently I’ve felt a little like that. There’s a difference between a short story and what just feels like a teaser to a really GOOD book that’s just not there. Maybe if this had been a selection of books and snippets it would have been better because I thought the premise of the story was really good.

Overall I enjoyed this but I  think if I had bought this in paperback i would have been quite disappointed. At thirty pages I almost (I’m sorry) thought was it worth it? I just felt there could have been so much more to this tale. The continuation of the language barrier, the relationship between the two women as her cousin gets closer to her due dates; there’s a real story there but it’s missing here. I think if this had been worked into more stories then this would have been better, but right now, it’s just not enough for me?

Links

Goodreads

Amazon

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