The Second Coming: A guest post by Karen Long

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Bookish Thoughts…

 I haven’t always written crime fiction but I have always read and studied forensic science. It had always been a delicious fantasy that I would suddenly develop an aptitude for study and become a pathologist but I didn’t, on either score. However, my grounding in the sciences from a later degree and an eye for a title grab (see below), enabled me to acquire a solid grounding in how a crime scene is worked, how to kill someone, how to cover your tracks and why that is so difficult in the light of modern forensics.

 The Forensic Casebook: N.E. Genge

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This is my favourite book on the subject of, well pretty much every aspect of forensics. It begins by defining what the differences are between the ‘scene of crime’ and the ‘crime scene’, a seemingly dry semantic debate. However, Genge’s style is pithy and well illustrated, using television, film and real life cases to expand and clarify concepts. The presentation is varied and invites a ‘dip in’ approach to reading. Bullet points, different fonts and highlighted sections break the material down into appetising segments. I loved the incidental job adverts and the well edited interviews with crime scene workers. The only weakness I would note is that the paperback copy I own has been published on very poor quality paper, which made the black and white photographs very difficult to view.

 Forensic Entomology: Dorothy E. Gennard

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I wouldn’t say this was an easy, or accessible read…at all. It is a serious, well documented degree level text book. There are some photographs but nowhere near enough for the lay reader. If I’m going to dip in, this is not a linear read by the way, I either access images on the internet or have an identifier open. I find insects astonishingly beautiful and alien, their life cycles and behaviour, which when combined with temperature, can pinpoint the time of death, is something I am particularly interested in.

 Postmortem: Dr Steven A. Koehler and Dr. Cyril H. Wecht

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This book has lots of glossy photographs and thoughtfully presented diagrams. The material is compact but it’s designed as a quick introduction to the study of forensics and, as such, is a great writer’s help. The photographs don’t pull their punches and the case notes are relevant, if a little rushed. There is an excellent chart on p75, which measures the visual changes of different bruises over a time period of 15 days. If it’s an exciting introduction to the discipline you’re after, then this book is the one for you.

 Molecules of Murder: John Emsley

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I am happy to recommend any of John Emsley’s books. They are well written, well researched and don’t skimp on the science. Each chapter has selected a poison and exemplifies its usage in numerous crimes both historical and contemporary. There is a helpful glossary, which gives further information on highlighted words. I confess to being particularly intrigued by the use of poisons and loved the way that Emsley’s conversational and enthusiastic style jumps out of the narrative, on occasion, and sweeps the reader off on an anecdotal journey.

 I believe that books make books. You read, absorb and mold information into narratives. Fact, however seemingly dry and inconsequential, is the basis of all crime fiction. Without a working knowledge of how forensics are applied in a contemporary, or even an historic setting, there will be gaps in your plot, or opportunities missed. I am not advocating that fiction should be determined solely by fact, you are not writing a textbook but to omit or fudge modern criminalistics is to deny richness and depth to your story.

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 Blog Tour: The Vault reviewed by mylittlebookblog

A Q+A by mylittlebookblog with Karen Long 

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