True Cheese: Aida Bode

Morning little bloggers, I have been getting myself stuck into a number of different books recently, and it has been incredibly refreshing! It’s been a tough couple of months but I have really found myself looking to the future, and although now it is a little more uncertain than it was before I know that things have been getting better, which is making me feel incredibly positive. Additionally reading this book/collection of poems that I am reviewing here has been incredibly liberating. As it is only a short book this review will be a little bit shorter in length however just as detailed as always. Anyway enough of my warbling…onto the review

True Cheese is a collection of poetic wanderings about nature, self-search and love. Aida Bode brings a unique perspective on such “cheesy” subjects and eliminates the clichés and the ordinary outlook of these elements that enrich our daily lives. This lovely little book of what I assume you would class as poems takes another look at the tasteless clichés of life and adds a little perspective on them! Poems include themes that range from love and devotion, to sadness, the world, and the idea of an eternity. Each poem, however, has a little sarcastic twist that really makes you think about the sayings that we use all the time to explain our love or hope or joy. The book doesn’t take a negative stance, but instead looks more deeply into the lines that spin to try and explain our feelings. The only thing I found a little insufferable about the book was the title. The title ‘true cheese,’ really put me off the book; it was only after finding it squished in the middle of another pile of books that I sat myself down and forced myself to read. On reading the first page I was finding it hard not to smile, and I sat a devoured the whole book in an evening; favourites include

 ‘In New York

Love wears a label

‘Made in China,’

 

and

 

They say that there is

A love relationship

Between the sun and the earth

How can I believe it

When at night

They’re both alone

Another, small problem I had, was that I would have liked the poems to have been a little longer. They are incredibly poignant and they make you think about the clichés that are told; however I would have liked a little more to get my teeth into and to gain my own interpretation of the words on the pages. Only a couple of the poems are more than a few lines long and I think it would have helped to put a few longer ones in to add contrast to the book. However it is a lovely little read and may make you think more about life’s clichés.

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